Answers To Common Questions We Get

Pediatric dentists are the Pediatricians of dentistry. Pediatric dentistry is the specialty of dentistry that focuses on the oral health and unique needs of young people. After completing a four-year dental school curriculum, two to three additional years of rigorous training is required to become a pediatric dentist. This specialized program of study and hands-on experience prepares pediatric dentists to meet the unique needs of your infants, children and adolescents, including persons with special health care needs. It is important to always verify your dentist’s credentials.

The Mission of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry is to verify to the public and to the health professions that a pediatric dentist has successfully completed both an advanced educational program accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation and a voluntary examination process designed to validate the knowledge, application, and performance requisite to the delivery of proficient care in pediatric dentistry.

The American Board of Pediatric Dentistry is the only certifying board recognized by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association for the specialty of Pediatric Dentistry.

All children are not alike! Our Board Certified pediatric dentist provides an ongoing assessment of the changes in your child’s oral health. As an expert in dental development, Dr. Crippen monitors your child’s needs and provides advice and treatment to ensure a winning smile. From teething infants to appearance-conscious teenagers, Dr. Crippen provides individualized dental care based on comprehensive dental research and extensive clinical experience.

We are concerned about your child’s total health care. Good oral health is an important part of total health. Establishing us as your child’s, “Dental Home” provides us the opportunity to implement preventive dental health habits that keep a child free from dental/oral disease. We focus on prevention, early detection and treatment of dental diseases, and keep current on the latest advances in dentistry for children.

Pleasant visits to the dental office promote the establishment of trust and confidence in your child that will last a lifetime. Our goal, along with our staff, is to help all children feel good about visiting the dentist and teach them how to care for their teeth. From our special office design, to our communication style, our main concern is what is best for your child.

Four things are necessary for cavities to form: 1) a tooth; 2) bacteria; 3) sugars or other carbohydrates; and 4) time. We can share with you how to make teeth strong, keep bacteria from organizing into harmful colonies, develop healthy eating habits, and understand the role that time plays. Remember, dental decay is an infection of the tooth. Visiting us early can help avoid unnecessary cavities and dental treatment. The pediatric dental community is continually doing research to develop new techniques for preventing dental decay and other forms of oral disease. Studies show that children with poor oral health have decreased school performance, poor social relationships and less success later in life. Children experiencing pain from decayed teeth are distracted and unable to concentrate on schoolwork.

 

 

It is very important that primary teeth are kept in place until they are lost naturally. Most children will have their baby molars until they are 12 years-of-age! These teeth serve a number of critical functions.

Primary teeth:
– Maintain good nutrition by permitting your child to chew properly.
– Are involved in speech development.

Help the permanent teeth by saving space for them and “guiding” them into their correct position. A healthy smile can help children feel good about the way they look to others.

As with permanent teeth, baby teeth can become decayed or infected. Typically this decay process happens more rapidly in baby teeth. Infections are painful and can lead to facial swellings, which may effect the development of the permanent teeth and put your child’s health at risk. Getting an early start in regular dental care is an important step on the road to teaching your child healthy lifetime habits. We want to share with you the latest available methods for keeping your child healthy and safe.

The first dental visit should occur shortly after the first tooth erupts and no later than the child’s first birthday. Beginning tooth and mouth examinations early may lead to detection of early stages of tooth decay that can be easily treated. In addition, early visits allow a child to become accustom to the dental office environment and staff. At the first visit we will present:

  1. A program of preventive home care including brushing, flossing, diet and the importance of fluorides.
  2. A caries risk assessment.
  3. Information about Early Childhood Caries, which may be due to inappropriate nursing habits or inappropriate use of sippy cups.
  4. The latest facts about finger, thumb and pacifier habits.
  5. What you need to know about preventing injuries to the mouth and teeth.
  6. Information on growth and development.

Adolescents have special needs. Appearance and self-image are very important to them. Decayed or poorly positioned teeth or jaws might make them more self-conscious. Teens also eat frequently, and unhealthy snack foods tend to become a major part of their regular diet. We provide a professional, sensitive and caring approach to restoring and guiding teeth, and teaching preventive dental health care through the teen’s high school years. When necessary, we will provide information on sealants, oral piercing, wisdom teeth, missing teeth and tobacco use.

Good oral health is an important part of total health. When helping children and adolescents, we often work with pediatricians, other physicians and dental specialists. All young people are served best through this team approach. We, the pediatric dentists, are an important part of your child’s health team.

Baby teeth and permanent teeth have deep pits and grooves on the chewing surface of the tooth. These areas are difficult to keep clean, even with good brushing habits. Dental sealants work by filling in or “sealing” the deep pits and grooves on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Sealants prevent plaque and bacteria from accumulating in those deep grooves and pits, thus reducing your child’s risk of developing dental decay. Sealants are tooth colored plastic material. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for years to come.

Oral sucking habits are normal for babies and young children. Most children stop sucking on thumbs, fingers, and pacifiers on their own between two and four years of age. Usually, no harm is done to their teeth or jaws. In children who continue to suck on thumbs, fingers, and pacifiers, changes may be noted in tooth position and supporting bone structure.

At Capital Pediatric Dentistry, we recommend that children stop oral habits well before the eruption of their first permanent tooth, usually by the age of five. In children who continue with sucking habits, we recommend the use of positive reinforcement for motivation. As a pediatric dentist, Dr. Crippen can offer helpful advice to parents, as well as recommend more aggressive treatment including the use of mouth appliances and retainers.

In teeth with extensive decay, bacteria from the cavity often infect the nerve of the tooth. This can lead to pain and swelling. In baby teeth that are infected, a procedure called a pulpotomy may be recommended. A pulpotomy is the removal of the unhealthy or “infected” portion of the nerve of the tooth. The healthy portion of the nerve remains, medicine is placed in the tooth, and it is then covered by a silver or white crown. This allows for the baby tooth to remain in the mouth, thus aiding chewing and maintaining proper spacing for the permanent teeth.

Spacers or space maintainers are appliances that are placed when children prematurely lose a baby tooth or are missing a permanent tooth. Spacers prevent the unwanted movement or “drift” of both baby and permanent teeth. They maintain the ideal space for the developing permanent tooth, thus limiting future orthodontic problems.

Another type of spacer called a “lower lingual holder arch” or LLHA may be indicated in children with crowed lower teeth. A LLHA can help prevent further crowding and is an important aspect in early orthodontic intervention.

At Capital Pediatric Dentistry we welcome children with special needs. Special needs children may be at a higher risk for dental decay due to special diets, special medications, or difficulty in maintaining good oral hygiene. Dr. Crippen has extensive training and experience in treating patients, of all ages, with special needs. Each patient will receive the extra time they need to ensure all aspects of oral health are evaluated.

Please inform our staff of any special healthcare needs your child may have so we may schedule the appropriate amount of time for their appointment.

If your child is in pain or has an emergency please contact our office at (916) 476.3974. We always have time in our schedule for any emergency.

* An after hours number will be provided on our recording.

Fill Out New Patient Forms Here

Please click on each link below to fill out our new patient forms prior to your child’s first visit.

Form 1: Registration Form

Form 2: Medical History Form

What is a Pediatric Dentist?

Pediatric dentists are the Pediatricians of dentistry.  Pediatric dentistry is the specialty of dentistry that focuses on the oral health and unique needs of young people. After completing a four-year dental school curriculum, two to three additional years of rigorous training is required to become a pediatric dentist. This specialized program of study and hands-on experience prepares pediatric dentists to meet the unique needs of your infants, children and adolescents, including persons with special health care needs.  It is important to always verify your dentist’s credentials. 

What does it mean to be a "Board Certified" Pediatric Dentist?

The Mission of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry is to verify to the public and to the health professions that a pediatric dentist has successfully completed both an advanced educational program accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation and a voluntary examination process designed to validate the knowledge, application, and performance requisite to the delivery of proficient care in pediatric dentistry. The American Board of Pediatric Dentistry is the only certifying board recognized by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association for the specialty of Pediatric Dentistry.

Why Should I Take My Child to Capital Pediatric Dentistry?

All children are not alike! Our Board Certified pediatric dentist provides an ongoing assessment of the changes in your child’s oral health. As an expert in dental development, Dr. Crippen monitors your child’s needs and provides advice and treatment to ensure a winning smile. From teething infants to appearance-conscious teenagers, Dr. Crippen provides individualized dental care based on comprehensive dental research and extensive clinical experience.

We are concerned about your child’s total health care. Good oral health is an important part of total health. Establishing us as your child’s, “Dental Home” provides us the opportunity to implement preventive dental health habits that keep a child free from dental/oral disease. We focus on prevention, early detection and treatment of dental diseases, and keep current on the latest advances in dentistry for children.

Pleasant visits to the dental office promote the establishment of trust and confidence in your child that will last a lifetime. Our goal, along with our staff, is to help all children feel good about visiting the dentist and teach them how to care for their teeth. From our special office design, to our communication style, our main concern is what is best for your child.

How do I prevent Tooth Decay?

Four things are necessary for cavities to form: 1) a tooth; 2) bacteria; 3) sugars or other carbohydrates; and 4) time. We can share with you how to make teeth strong, keep bacteria from organizing into harmful colonies, develop healthy eating habits, and understand the role that time plays. Remember, dental decay is an infection of the tooth. Visiting us early can help avoid unnecessary cavities and dental treatment. The pediatric dental community is continually doing research to develop new techniques for preventing dental decay and other forms of oral disease. Studies show that children with poor oral health have decreased school performance, poor social relationships and less success later in life. Children experiencing pain from decayed teeth are distracted and unable to concentrate on schoolwork.

Why are Primary Teeth (Baby Teeth) Important?

It is very important that primary teeth are kept in place until they are lost naturally. Most children will have their baby molars until they are 12 years-of-age! These teeth serve a number of critical functions.

Primary teeth:
– Maintain good nutrition by permitting your child to chew properly.
– Are involved in speech development.
– Help the permanent teeth by saving space for them and “guiding” them into their correct position. A healthy smile can help children feel good about the way they look to others.

As with permanent teeth, baby teeth can become decayed or infected. Typically this decay process happens more rapidly in baby teeth. Infections are painful and can lead to facial swellings, which may effect the development of the permanent teeth and put your child’s health at risk. Getting an early start in regular dental care is an important step on the road to teaching your child healthy lifetime habits. We want to share with you the latest available methods for keeping your child healthy and safe.

When should I take my child to the dentist for their first check-up?

The first dental visit should occur shortly after the first tooth erupts and no later than the child’s first birthday. Beginning tooth and mouth examinations early may lead to detection of early stages of tooth decay that can be easily treated. In addition, early visits allow a child to become accustom to the dental office environment and staff. At the first visit we will present:

  1. A program of preventive home care including brushing, flossing, diet and the importance of fluorides.
  2. A caries risk assessment.
  3. Information about Early Childhood Caries, which may be due to inappropriate nursing habits or inappropriate use of sippy cups.
  4. The latest facts about finger, thumb and pacifier habits.
  5. What you need to know about preventing injuries to the mouth and teeth.
  6. Information on growth and development.

What special care is given to adolescents?

Adolescents have special needs. Appearance and self-image are very important to them. Decayed or poorly positioned teeth or jaws might make them more self-conscious. Teens also eat frequently, and unhealthy snack foods tend to become a major part of their regular diet. We provide a professional, sensitive and caring approach to restoring and guiding teeth, and teaching preventive dental health care through the teen’s high school years. When necessary, we will provide information on sealants, oral piercing, wisdom teeth, missing teeth and tobacco use.

Good oral health is an important part of total health. When helping children and adolescents, we often work with pediatricians, other physicians and dental specialists. All young people are served best through this team approach. We, the pediatric dentists, are an important part of your child’s health team.

How do dental sealants work?

Baby teeth and permanent teeth have deep pits and grooves on the chewing surface of the tooth. These areas are difficult to keep clean, even with good brushing habits. Dental sealants work by filling in or “sealing” the deep pits and grooves on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Sealants prevent plaque and bacteria from accumulating in those deep grooves and pits, thus reducing your child’s risk of developing dental decay. Sealants are tooth colored plastic material. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for years to come.

Are thumb sucking and pacifier habits harmful for my child's teeth?

Oral sucking habits are normal for babies and young children. Most children stop sucking on thumbs, fingers, and pacifiers on their own between two and four years of age. Usually, no harm is done to their teeth or jaws. In children who continue to suck on thumbs, fingers, and pacifiers, changes may be noted in tooth position and supporting bone structure.

At Capital Pediatric Dentistry, we recommend that children stop oral habits well before the eruption of their first permanent tooth, usually by the age of five. In children who continue with sucking habits, we recommend the use of positive reinforcement for motivation. As a pediatric dentist, Dr. Crippen can offer helpful advice to parents, as well as recommend more aggressive treatment including the use of mouth appliances and retainers.

What is a pulpotomy (Nerve Treatment)?

In teeth with extensive decay, bacteria from the cavity often infect the nerve of the tooth. This can lead to pain and swelling. In baby teeth that are infected, a procedure called a pulpotomy may be recommended. A pulpotomy is the removal of the unhealthy or “infected” portion of the nerve of the tooth. The healthy portion of the nerve remains, medicine is placed in the tooth, and it is then covered by a silver or white crown. This allows for the baby tooth to remain in the mouth, thus aiding chewing and maintaining proper spacing for the permanent teeth.

What is a Spacer?

Spacers or space maintainers are appliances that are placed when children prematurely lose a baby tooth or are missing a permanent tooth. Spacers prevent the unwanted movement or “drift” of both baby and permanent teeth. They maintain the ideal space for the developing permanent tooth, thus limiting future orthodontic problems.

Another type of spacer called a “lower lingual holder arch” or LLHA may be indicated in children with crowed lower teeth. A LLHA can help prevent further crowding and is an important aspect in early orthodontic intervention.

What if my child has special needs?

At Capital Pediatric Dentistry we welcome children with special needs. Special needs children may be at a higher risk for dental decay due to special diets, special medications, or difficulty in maintaining good oral hygiene. Dr. Crippen has extensive training and experience in treating patients, of all ages, with special needs. Each patient will receive the extra time they need to ensure all aspects of oral health are evaluated.

Please inform our staff of any special healthcare needs your child may have so we may schedule the appropriate amount of time for their appointment.

Why if my child has a dental emergency?

If your child is in pain or has an emergency please contact our office at (916) 476.3974. We always have time in our schedule for any emergency.

* An after hours number will be provided on our recording.

Fill Out New Patient Forms Here

Please click on each link below if you would like to fill out our new patient forms prior to your child’s first visit.

Form 1: Registration Form

Form 2: Medical History Form

There’s a parking garage attached to our office building, where we will validate your ticket. There’s also street parking on the nearby residential streets. We hope to see you soon!
sleep dentist for kids sacramento capital pediatric dentistry
Get In Touch
LOCATION

920 29th Street
Sacramento, CA
95816

Contact
Hours

Monday:  7:30AM – 5:00PM
Tuesday:  7:30AM – 5:00PM
Wednesday:  7:30AM – 5:00PM
Thursday:  7:30AM – 5:00PM
Friday:  By Appointment

© 2020 Capital Pediatric Dentistry. All rights Reserved.